Illinois Urogynecology, LTD.




Frequently Asked Questions

FAQ General

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What is a Urogynecologist?
If I need a prolapse surgery or a hysterectomy, what is the best approach?
What happens if I choose not to have treatment for my incontinence or for my prolapse?
Is it true that the only real treatment for incontinence and prolapse is surgery?
Is incontinence a normal part of aging?
Am I too old for surgery?
Is it true that bladder surgery doesn't work?
Do I need to have a hysterectomy to fix my bladder problem?
Aren't pessaries old-fashioned and only for old ladies?
What happens if I choose not to have treatment for my incontinence or for my prolapse?
Do you treat men with urinary incontinence?  

 

What is a Urogynecologist?

A Urogynecologist (also known as Urogynecologist and Pelvic Reconstructive Surgeon) is a physician who has completed 4 years of residency training in Obstetrics and Gynecology and then further completed a fellowship in urogynecology and pelvic reconstructive surgery. Currently, the fellowship length is 3 years.

Urogynecologists evaluate and treat women with a multitude of pelvic problems, including: urinary frequency, urinary incontinence, urinary retention, pelvic organ prolapse, uterine disorders, voiding dysfunction, bladder pain and sexual dysfunction.


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If I need a prolapse surgery or a hysterectomy, what is the best approach?
Our surgeons strongly believe that the best approach to surgery would be the least invasive surgery that allows the procedure to be accomplished safely. In terms of safest and least invasive, first would be vaginal surgery, followed by laparoscopic surgery and then robotically- assisted surgery. The most invasive surgery is an open or abdominal surgery.
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What happens if I choose not to have treatment for my incontinence or for my prolapse?

Women can always choose to live with their conditions. In most cases, the incontinence or prolapse will worsen with time if left untreated. Treatment can be initiated when the problem worsens sufficiently to cause a woman to choose therapy. In rare cases, when the bladder has prolapsed past the vaginal opening and bladder emptying is compromised, the kidneys may be affected and opting for no treatment would be a dangerous option.


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Is it true that the only real treatment for incontinence and prolapse is surgery?

The short answer is- NO.

Most of the women who visit IULTD for evaluation will learn that there are many choices, including non-surgical and surgical treatment. Based on our experience, we will be able to tell you which therapy we believe is your best option. Ultimately, our goal is to educate you regarding your condition and your choices and help you to make the best decision for you!


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Is incontinence a normal part of aging?

The short answer is- NO.

Urinary and fecal incontinence become more common with advanced age, but are NEVER a normal part of aging. If incontinence is negatively affecting your quality of life, then it is likely that the physicians at IULTD have a solution to help you.


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Am I too old for surgery?

The short answer is – NO.

Each of our physicians will evaluate your overall health and the degree of your urogynecological problem and then help you decide if a non-surgical or surgical option is right for you. Because all we do is urogynecology, we have options that other practicioners may not have available. Often we can tailor procedures to be done under relatively low-risk local anesthesia, in order to provide significant symptom relief, if not complete cure for older women who have been told by others that they are too old for surgery.


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Is it true that bladder surgery doesn't work?

The short answer is – NO.

In the past, “bladder lifts” and “incontinence surgeries” have developed a bad reputation because of high recurrence rates. Because of our expertise, years of experience and high volume surgery rates, our success rates continue to excel well above national and local averages. Each physician will educate you as to the expected chance of improvement or cure, based on our experience and your individual condition, and help guide you to a decision regarding therapy.


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Do I need to have a hysterectomy to fix my bladder problem?

The short answer is – NO.

If a woman is planning to correct incontinence or pelvic organ prolapse surgically, hysterectomy may not be necessary. Your IULTD physician will discuss your desires for hysterectomy, goals of surgery, and likely chances of cure with and without the hysterectomy based on your individual circumstances.


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Aren't pessaries old-fashioned and only for old ladies?

The short answer is- NO.

Women with prolapse have the option of wearing a pessary for relieving the symptoms of pelvic organ prolapse. IULTD physicians have successfully treated women of all ages with pessaries. Ultimately, our goal is to educate you regarding your condition and your choices and help you to make the best decision for you!


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What happens if I choose not to have treatment for my incontinence or for my prolapse?

Women can always choose to live with their conditions. In most cases the incontinence or prolapse will worsen with time if left untreated. Treatment can be initiated when the problem worsens sufficiently to cause a woman to choose therapy. In rare cases, when the bladder has prolapsed past the vaginal opening and bladder emptying is compromised, the kidneys may be affected and opting for no treatment would be a dangerous option.


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Do you treat men with urinary incontinence?

We do not evaluate or treat men with urinary incontinence. Please check the list of resources as these sites will direct you to proper locations. An alternative is the American Urologic Association. www.AUA.org


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